Aiptek 3D-HD High Definition 3D Camcorder

With the Aiptek 3D Camcorder, you can take still pictures and videos in either 3D or 2D. On the screen on the back, you can watch the 3D video live as you record it. The camera records videos in the mp4 playback, which is compatible with most new

I ran into this very interesting gadget - a high definition stereoscopic camcorder.  Let's have a look at the Aiptek 3D-HD High Definition Camcorder.

If you're like me though, there are a few things you'd like to know first.  Like what they mean with HD, for we have learned that though HD to us means  1920 x 1080 resolution, in the market of video cameras anything that records in a higher resolution than Standard Definition is referred to as HD, even if it's not 1920 x 1080.

In the case of the Aiptek 3D camcorder, High Definition means that the camera captures two different angles at 640 x 720p.  Sounds like a lowish resolution, however when the two are combined, they create a 3D effect that approximates a resolution of 1280 x 720p.  The quality of still photographs taken with this unit is 5 megapixes.   

Now that you know basically at which resolution standard this video camera is at, let's have a look at some other features:

With the Aiptek 3D Camcorder, you can take still pictures and videos in either 3D or 2D. 

On the screen on the back, you can watch the 3D video live as you record it. 

The camera records videos in the mp4 playback, which is compatible with most new 3D HD television sets.  And if you have NVIDIA 3D Vision technology on your PC or laptop, you can capture, edit, and play back all of your 3D recordings using the state-of-the-art Active Shutter 3D Technology.

The Aiptek 3D-HD camcorder features an HDMI output that lets you connect it directly to your HDTV, 3D HDTV, or other monitor for video and photo playback. There is also a built-in USB port so you can easily connect to your PC to download videos and photos for viewing or editing.

If your HD television is not 3D capable, the software lets you convert your videos to the 3D "Anaglyph" format, which is the classic 3D technology that requires red-and-blue glasses. Once you've converted your videos or photos to this format using the software, simply use polarized glasses to view your 3D creations on a standard HDTV or computer monitor.

The camera has no internal storage.  It records on up to 32 GB HDSC cards. 

Drawbacks are: 

- No optical zoom.

- No image stabilization. 

- No flash for still photographs. 

Click here to find out more about this small sized camera. 

Or, for a more serious stereoscopic video camera, check out the Panasonic HDC-SDT750K

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